North Suburban Synagogue Beth El
Classes

Classes

Our Organization!

It is no coincidence that the Religious School is housed in the synagogue building. Our goal is to create a strong family connection, one where the child views the synagogue and the school within it as an extension of home. This second home is designed to provide students with an opportunity to explore and deepen their understanding of Judaism.

Religious School facilitates the development of the students’ Jewish identity through the study of Jewish liturgy, rituals, customs, Hebrew language, life-cycle events, Jewish holidays, and Jewish history. Studies include both Hebrew and Jewish culture every time students are in school. The academic program is enhanced by combining learning with the arts in omanut (art), musikah (music), sifryiah (library), t’nuah (movement), and bishul (cooking).

In addition to our grade-level classes, we offer many multi-age activities, including chugim, and Shabbat morning services: Thinkin’ About Shabbat.

Sunday 9:00 a.m. to noon

Goals:

  • Teach Hebrew words and short phrases through music, games, movement and visual aids.
  • Uncover the joys of our holiday traditions, such as eating challah on Shabbat, shaking the lulav and etrog on Sukkot or preparing  mishloach manot on Purim.
  • Explore Jewish holidays through songs, movement, stories, art, music, dramatic play and cooking.
  • Discover the mitzvot by doing mitzvot and by sharing the notion that one mitzvah leads to another mitzvah (mitzvah goreret mitzvah).
  • Memorize the basic blessings – Shema and Modeh/Modah Ani, blessings for food and for holidays.
  • Bring learning home by involving families in home activities and family programs.

Sunday 9:00 a.m. to noon

Goals:

  • Impart a basic knowledge of spoken Hebrew that will provide a foundation for future study of the language through the use of fun games.
  • Introduce the concept of Israel as the home of the Jewish people; connect the biblical land with the modern state; explore the country’s major cities.
  • Explore Jewish holidays through a multidisciplinary approach integrating the holidays with art, music, drama and creative-thinking activities.
  • Continue to explore the mitzvot by doing mitzvot and by sharing the notion that one mitzvah leads to another mitzvah (mitzvah goreret mitzvah).
  • Continue to reinforce the basic blessings – Shema and Modeh/Modah Ani, in addition to the blessings for food and for holidays and Shabbat.
  • Introduce Torah stories and biblical heroes.
  • Involve families in home activities and family programs.
  • Families are encouraged to attend Tot Shabbat services.

Sunday 9:00 a.m. to noon

Goals:

  • Continue to provide a foundation for future study of the language using Chalav U’Dvash. This is a fun, innovative program featuring Bentzi, a Hebrew-speaking turtle puppet from Israel. Teach basic Hebrew vocabulary, Hebrew songs, and oral Hebrew expressions. Connect Hebrew to everyday social situations related to the childrens’ experiences in the home, at school, and in encounters with friends in Hebrew. Exercise right-left directionality and learn to write their Hebrew name.
  • Explore Jewish holidays retelling each holiday story, introducing key holiday objects, rituals and holiday vocabulary.
  • Introduce the joy of prayers by learning the most important prayers of the Shabbat morning service.
  • Teach Torah stories and focus on distinctive Jewish values drawn from them.
  • Connect the mitzvot with the Jewish holidays, Torah stories and Jewish symbols.
  • Prepare students to lead one Tot Shabbat morning service. Families are enouraged to attend Tot Shabbat services.

Sunday 9:00 a.m. to noon
Tuesday OR Wednesday 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Goals:

  • Develop basic literacy and decoding skills using the Tal Am curriculum. Acquire phonological awareness, sound and structure of words, ability to divide the words into syllables, to compose a word out of separate sounds, to add a sound to a word or delete one from it, to reverse the order of the sounds. Gain familiarity with words and their forms and sounds. Identify all letters and sounds, names of letters, vowels and writing of the Hebrew letters.
  • Develop oral expression. Emulate words spoken by the teacher. Articulate single words for the purpose of naming the environment, or naming pictures pertaining to the subject being studied. Use expressions that are frequently repeated in classroom communication within the context of the subject being studied.
  • Learn the symbols, the foods, the blessings, and selected songs for each holiday in Hebrew using the Tal Am Chag Sameach curriculum.
  • Learn to read and chant selected prayers of the Kabbalat Shabbat and Ma’ariv services. The Bet class will participate in one Kabbalat Shabbat/Ma’ariv service in the spring.
  • Students are encouraged to participate in Thinkin’ About Shabbat on Shabbat mornings. Students are encouraged to read one or two lines of Torah.

Sunday 9:00 a.m. to noon
Tuesday OR Wednesday 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Goals:

  • Correctly identify letters and vowels, syllables and sentences as individual words.
  • Communicate using single words, expressions and language patterns acquired in subjects studied on a regular basis. Communication is comprised of brief sentences and echoes of words spoken by the teacher on subjects studied on a regular basis.
  • Learn to construct simple sentences in Hebrew describing the symbols, the foods, the blessings, and selected songs for each holiday using the Tal Am Chag Sameach curriculum.
  • Read and chant selected prayers of the Kabbalat Shabbat/Ma’ariv services and Shabbat morning service.
  • Read true-to-text translation of Torah stories from Genesis to Exodus. Provide opportunities to participate in biblical dialogue by reviewing classic interpretation of text and creating midrashim. Explore connections between text and core Jewish values and help personalize the Torah stories. Analyze and memorize the key Hebrew words and phrases of the Torah stories.
  • Students are encouraged to participate in Thinkin’ About Shabbat on Shabbat mornings.  Families are invited to Kabbalat Shabbat Service and dinner on Friday, April 24, 2020.

Students are required to attend one six-week chug of their liking.

Sunday 9:00 a.m. to noon
Tuesday OR Wednesday 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Goals:

  • Read syllables and sentences with considerable fluency.
  • Formulate communication through the arrangement and combination of words and language patterns acquired in class. Respond correctly to communication initiated by the teacher. Answer and generate simple questions.
  • Learn to construct from simple to more complex sentences in Hebrew describing the symbols, the foods, the blessings, and selected songs for each holiday.
  • Read and chant selected prayers of the Minchah/Havdalah service and Shabbat morning service (using Siddur Lev Shalelm).
  • Articulate positive Jewish identity.
  • Build breadth and depth of understanding about observance of Judaism while building on prior knowledge and current experiences.
  • Using the 4th Grade curriculum Etgar Yesodi, students will delve into the concepts of: Zikaron: My Roots, My Memories; Brit: My Beginning, My Name;  Berakhot: My Blessings;  Tokhehah: Improving My Friendships; Ma’akhil Re’evim: Sharing our Response to Hunger with Others, and Devekut: Developing My Relationship with God.
  • Families are invited to attend  Havdalah and Minhah/Seudah on Shabbat February 8, 2020.
  • Students are encouraged to participate in Thinkin’ About Shabbat on Shabbat mornings.

Students are required to attend one six-week chug of their liking.

Sunday 9:00 a.m. to noon
Tuesday OR Wednesday 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Goals:

  • Read Hebrew accurately and fluently.
  • Use vocabulary adequately to maintain a functional conversation. Respond correctly to communication initiated by the teacher. Answer and generate simple questions.
  • Compare and contrast the different Jewish holidays in Hebrew.  Learn age-appropriate short stories and songs for each holiday.
  • Learn Hebrew keyboarding skills.
  • Lead the Shabbat morning service using Siddur Lev Shalem. (Shabbat Family Services: Families are required to attend six Shabbat morning services).
  • Delve into the concepts of Etgar Yesodi, Grade 5: Living Our Values Together;   Piyyutim: Connecting Our Communities Through Poetry and Song;  Yisrael: A Modern Look at Our Ancient Land;  Ahrayut: Our Responsibility Toward Others;  A Gathering Across Z’man (Time) and Makom (Space);  Developing My Relationship with G-d.
  • Students are encouraged to attend Thinkin’ About Shabbat on Shabbat mornings.

Students are required to attend one six-week chug of their liking.

Sunday 9:00 a.m. to noon
Tuesday OR Wednesday 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Goals:

  • Read Hebrew accurately and fluently.
  • Use vocabulary adequately to maintain a functional conversation. Respond correctly to communication initiated by the teacher. Answer and generate simple questions.
  • Explore Jewish history from the Creation to the Expulsion of Jews from Spain.
  • Delve into the topics of Friendship, and Bikkur Cholim using Project Etgar in order empower students to wrestle with questions about G-d, commandments and being Jewish.
  • Lead the Shabbat morning service using Siddur Lev Shalem. (Shabbat Family Services: Families are required to attend six Shabbat morning services).
  • Participate in the “My Family Story” family root project sponsored by Beit Hatfutsot. At the center of “My Family Story” is the Manuel Hirsch Grosskopf International Competition in which Jewish institutions worldwide send their young participants’ best two projects to Beit Hatfutsot. This is a chance for students to win a free trip to Israel where they join the “My Family Story” annual event and have their projects displayed in an international exhibition at the museum.   Congratulations to this year’s winners Hannah Ayzman and Adam Smiley!

Students are required to attend one six-week chug of their liking.

Sunday 9:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Wednesday 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Goals:

  • Hebrew:  Read short stories, newspaper articles and comics in Hebrew. Respond correctly to communication initiated by the teacher and other students. Generate questions to texts.
  • Parents and students attend joint classes on Tefillah, the Jewish Life Cycle, and Tough Questions Jews Ask.
  • Learn 100 major concepts of Judaism and complete an assessment.
  • History: Learn the history from the Expulsion of Jews from Spain through the Modern Era, with emphasis on the historical developments in the Twentieth Century.
  • Learn about the Holocaust.
  • Social Action projects.