If you did not receive your High Holiday ticket with the members-only web address to access services, please call Kathy Stinson in the synagogue office at 847-432-8981 or email kstinson@nssbethel.org

 

Saying Kaddish

Saying Kaddish

What to do if I am supposed to say Kaddish?

The Rabbis insisted that Kaddish be said in a Minyan for various reasons. This is so heartwarming when this happens in practice – recall the community support in the room. But this requirement makes it doubly challenging when we cannot assemble.
Those saying Kaddish should do two things.
  1. Consider reciting this alternative to the Kaddish, found in our Siddur Lev Shalem. 
    https://www.rabbinicalassembly.org/sites/default/files/2020-03/mourning%20prayer%20when%20there%20is%20no%20minyan%20edited.pdf 
    This brief prayer can be comforting in part because some of the language is familiar.
  2. Consider studying a Jewish text in honor and in memory of your beloved. Mishnah – the first layer of the Talmud – is often studied in a person’s memory because the Hebrew letters in the word ‘Mishnah’ are the same as in ‘Neshama,’ which means ‘Soul.’ Perhaps the most accessible tractate of Mishnah is Pirkei Avot. The Ethics of our Fathers contains so much life wisdom – https://www.sefaria.org/Pirkei_Avot.1?lang=bi

A function of saying Kaddish is sanctifying G-d’s name, which can also be achieved by learning a religious text expressly because of our loved one’s influence.  Any religious text is appropriate. If you’re not sure where to begin, consider https://www.myjewishlearning.com. Or Rabbi Freedman’s Five in Five Parsha videos – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTeLi8yYrZ1cTjVhqWZvNmQ/video